Joao Paulo Ferreira

Joao Paulo Ferreira

Visiting Fellow
Federal University of Sao Carlos, Brazil
Ferreira
João Paulo Ferreira is a Brazilian sociologist currently interested in themes related to academic knowledge production from biomedical sciences, mainly in the intersection between biological and gerontological knowledge created and disseminated since the second half of the twentieth century, focusing on the 1980s and 1990s – a period socially recognized by the sexual panic of the HIV-Aids epidemic.
His Ph.D. research aims to describe and historically analyse the biomedical production in gerontology, which emerged and spread during and after the peak of deaths caused by AIDS in three different national contexts (Brazil, the United Kingdom and the United States of America) in the Web of Science database before the commercialization of the antiretroviral cocktail, and its representations of (homo)sexuality, gender and healthy aging. Through the concepts of “representation”, “apparatus of sexuality”, “hegemonic masculinity” and “biopolitics” he intends to reflect and discuss the roles conferred in biomedical knowledge on gender and health which have crystalized since the 1980s renewed notions of body, illness, frailty, corporeality, identity, risk groups, normal sex/desire and gender, as social and scientific representations organized and fixed by biological imperatives – interpreted and identified in his research through the concept of “biomarkers”. These biological imperatives, as an extension and result of psi-biosciences might be theorized from the idea of “biosocial turn”, principally because gerontological knowledge is identified contemporaneously from the association of interdisciplinary studies focused on social, psychological and biological approaches. Here “biosocial” is used to reframe biology/society debates within the sociological disciplines. The research is particularly interested on the long tradition of exchanges between biology, epidemiology, sociology and psychology, a tradition that can not easily be reduced to reductionism, determinism and two supposedly discrete and insulated “poles”.